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Federal Skilled Worker

As of January 2015, CIC has a new system to manage how people apply to this program. It is called Express Entry.

You can use our online tool, Come to Canada, to see if you meet the criteria to get into the Express Entry pool.

Minimum requirements

Skilled work experience

Your work experience must be:

  • at least one year (1,560 hours total / 30 hours per week), continuous full-time or an equal amount in part-time,
  • paid work (volunteer work, unpaid internships do not count),
  • in the same NOC skill type (0, A or B) ,
  • within the last 10 years, and
  • at skill type 0, or skill levels A or B of the 2011 National Occupational Classification (NOC).

Full Time

30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)

Part time

15 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)
OR
30 hours/week for 12 months at more than one job = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)

You must show that you did the duties set out in the lead statement of the occupational description in the NOC, including all the essential duties and most of the main duties listed.

If you cannot show that your work experience meets the description in the NOC, you are not eligible under this program.

Find out the NOC code, title and skill type or level for your job.

Language ability

You must:

  • meet the minimum language level of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7, and
  • take a language test approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) that shows you meet the level for speaking, listening, reading and writing.

You must show that you meet the requirements in English or French by including the test results when you complete your Express Entry profile. Your test results must not be more than two years old on the day you apply for permanent residence.

Education

You must have:

Six selection factors

If you meet all the conditions set out in the minimum requirements, we will assess your application based on the selection factors in the federal skilled worker points grid.

The selection factors are:

  • your skills in English and/or French (Canada's two official languages),
  • your education,
  • your work experience,
  • your age,
  • whether you have a valid job offer, and
  • your adaptability (how well you are likely to settle here).

To see how many points you might get, read about the selection factors.

If you have skilled work experience and want to live in Canada permanently, use our Come to Canada tool to see if you are eligible for the Express Entry pool.

Proof of funds

You must show that you have enough money to support yourself and your family after you arrive in Canada, unless you:

  • are currently able to legally work in Canada, and
  • have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada.

Principal applicant

If you are married or live with a common-law foreign national partner in Canada, and that person also meets the above conditions, you can decide which one of you will apply under Express Entry as a principal applicant.

common-law partner is a person who has lived with you in a conjugal relationship for at least one year. Common-law partner refers to both opposite-sex and same-sex couples.

Look at each selection factor and see which one of you is most likely to meet the eligibility requirements and earn the most points. That person should apply as the principal applicant.

Other requirements

  1. You must be admissible to Canada. Find out more about inadmissibility.
  2. You must plan to live outside the province of Quebec.

If you have skilled work experience and want to live in Canada permanently, use our Come to Canada tool to see if you are eligible for the Express Entry pool.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

These factors are part of a 100-point grid used to assess federal skilled workers. This means you earn points for how well you do in each of the six factors. The total points will show if you qualify for the Express Entry pool. The current pass mark is 67 points.


Six selection factors – Federal skilled workers

CIC assesses federal skilled worker applications based on six selection factors.

If you score 67 points or higher (out of 100), you may qualify to immigrate to Canada as a federal skilled worker.

If you score lower than the pass mark of 67 points, you will not qualify to immigrate to Canada as a federal skilled worker. It is better not to apply at this time.

Point grids for each factor:

1) English and/or French skills

(Maximum 28 points)

Being able to communicate and work in one or both of Canada’s official languages is very important. Knowing English, French or both helps you in the Canadian job market.

You can get up to 28 points for your skills in English and French. You will be given points based on your ability to

  • listen

  • speak

  • read and

  • write.

Language testing

You must prove the language levels you claim on your application with a language test from an agency approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

You will not get an invitation to apply if you do not include language test results for either English or French that show you meet the required level.

If you want to get points for your skills in both English and French, you must provide your language test results for each language at the same time.

Once you take this test, you can use it to see exactly how many points you will get for the language selection factor.

You can find more information about language testing and how to get it on this site.

Calculate your language points

You must meet the minimum level of CLB 7Footnote1 for your first official language in all four language areas.

To get points for your second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5Footnote1 in all four language areas.

Please Note: You can only get points for your second official language if you meet the threshold of CLB 5 in all four language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing). You can score four points for your second official language skills.

First Official Language

Points

Speaking

Listening

Reading

Writing

CLB level 9 or higher

6

6

6

6

CLB level 8

5

5

5

5

CLB level 7

4

4

4

4

Below CLB level 7

Not eligible to apply

Note: You can only get four points in total for basic-level skills in your second official language, and only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the four language abilities.

Second Official Language

Points

At least CLB5 in all of the four abilities

4

CLB 4 or less in any of the four abilities

0

2) Education

(Maximum 25 points)

You can earn selection points for your education.

To get points, you must:

  • prove that you earned a Canadian diploma or certificate, OR

  • have your foreign education assessed by an agency approved by CIC to show it is valid and equal to a completed Canadian credential.

You must include your Canadian credential or your foreign credential and Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report when you apply.

Education

Maximum 25 points

University degree at the Doctoral (PhD) level or equal

25 points

University degree at the Master’s level or equal OR University level entry-to-practice professional degree (or equal). Occupation related to the degree must be:

  • NOC 2011 Skill Level A, and

  • licensed by a provincial regulatory body.

Note: Degree program must be in one of these fields of study: Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Dentistry, Podiatry, Optometry, Law, Chiropractic Medicine, or Pharmacy.

23 points

Two or more Canadian post-secondary degrees or diplomas or equal (at least one must be for a program of at least three years)

22 points

Canadian post-secondary degree or diploma for a program of three years or longer, or equal

21 points

Canadian post-secondary degree or diploma for a two-year program, or equal

19 points

Canadian post-secondary degree or diploma for a one-year program, or equal

15 points

Canadian high school diploma, or equal

5 points

3) Experience

(Maximum 15 points)

You can get points for the number of years you have spent in full-time paid work (at least 30 hours per week, or an equal amount of part-time).

National Occupational Classification (NOC)

The NOC is a system used to classify jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for different jobs. CIC uses the 2011 edition of the NOC to assess skilled worker applications.

Finding your NOC category

This job code is referred to as your "NOC code" in the Express Entry profile. See Find your NOC to find the NOC information that best matches your jobs.

You will need this information again, so make sure to write it down and keep it with the other papers you need, such as your passport.

If the description and list of main duties match what you did at your last job(s), you can count this experience for points.

Use this chart to find the number of points based on your number of years of experience.

Experience

Maximum 15 points

1 year

9

2-3 years

11

4-5 years

13

6 or more years

15

4) Age

(Maximum 12 points)

You will get points based on your age on the day when the Centralized Intake Office gets your application.

Age

Points

Under 18

0

18-35

12

36

11

37

10

38

9

39

8

40

7

41

6

42

5

43

4

44

3

45

2

46

1

47 and older

0

5) Arranged employment in Canada

(Maximum 10 points)

In some cases, you can get points if you have a permanent, full-time job offer from a Canadian employer. The job must be arranged before you apply to come to Canada as a federal skilled worker.

A valid job offer has to be:

Find your points based on the chart below.

If

And

Points

You currently work in Canada on a temporary work permit.

Your work permit is valid both when you apply and when the visa is issued (or you are authorized to work in Canada without a work permit when your visa is issued).

and

CIC issued your work permit based on a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). Your employer would have applied for the LMIA, which you then had to attach to your application to CIC.

and

You are working for an employer named on your work permit who has made a permanent job offer based on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

10

You currently work in Canada in a job that is exempt from the LMIA requirement under:

  • an international agreement (such as, the North America Free Trade Agreement) or

  • a federal-provincial agreement.

Your work permit is valid both when you apply and when the visa is issued (or you are authorized to work in Canada without a permit when your visa is issued).

and

Your current employer has made a permanent job offer based on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

10

You currently do not:

  • have a work permit, or

  • plan to work in Canada before you get a permanent resident visa.

OR

You are currently working in Canada and a different employer has offered to give you a permanent full-time job.

OR

You are currently working in Canada in a job that is exempt from a Labour Market Impact Assessment, but notunder an international or federal-provincial agreement.

An employer has made you a permanent job offer based on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

and

The employer has a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment from ESDC.

10

Note:

  • You cannot get a Labour Market Impact Assessment from ESDC. Your employer must do this for you.

  • ESDC will only confirm permanent job offers for occupations listed in skill type O or skill level A or B of the NOC.

  • A CIC officer must be convinced that you are able to perform the job offered to you. If the occupation is regulated in Canada, the officer must also be convinced that you will be able to become licensed or certified when in Canada.

6) Adaptability

(Maximum 10 points)

If you have a spouse or common‑law partner who will immigrate with you to Canada, they can earn points for adaptability too. You can only get points for each item once.

The maximum number of points in this section is 10.

Adaptability

Maximum 10 points

Your spouse or partner’s language level

Your spouse or common-law partner has a language level in either English or French at CLB 4 levelor higher in all four language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

To get these points, you must submit test results from an approved agency when you apply. Results can not be more than two years old on the day you apply.

5

Your past study in Canada

You finished at least two academic years of full-time study (in a program at least two years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and you must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5

Your spouse or partner’s past study in Canada

Your spouse or common-law partner finished at least two academic years of full-time study (in a program at least two years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and your spouse or partner must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5

Your past work in Canada

You did at least one year of full-time work in Canada:

  1. in a occupation listed in Skill Type O or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC), and

  2. with a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada.

10

Your spouse or common-law partner’s past work in Canada

Your spouse / partner did at least one year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada.

5

Arranged Employment in Canada

You earned points under Factor 5: Arranged Employment.

5

Relatives in Canada

You, or, if it applies, your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative, either a

  • parent,

  • grandparent,

  • child,

  • grandchild,

  • child of a parent (sibling),

  • child of a grandparent (aunt or uncle), or

  • grandchild of a parent (niece or nephew), who is

    • living in Canada

    • 18 years or older and

    • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

5

Proof of funds – Skilled immigrants (Express Entry)


Note: We update these numbers every year based on 50 per cent of the Low Income Cut-Off totals. If you filled out your Express Entry profile before January 27, 2015, you may have received correspondence that your profile has been reassessed. You may want to double-check that you still have enough money, based on the new cut-off, to support your family if you immigrate to Canada. This change is small but there is a chance it could affect your eligibility.

Unless you are currently authorized to work in Canada and have a valid job offer from an employer in Canada, you must show that you have enough money to support yourself and your family after you get to Canada.

You cannot borrow this money from another person. You must be able to use this money to pay the costs of living for your family (even if they are not coming with you).

You will need to show proof to the Canadian visa office in your home country that you have enough money when you apply to immigrate.

The amount of money you need to support your family is set by the size of your family. We update these amounts every year.

Number of

Family Members

Funds Required

(in Canadian dollars)

1

$11,931

2

$14,853

3

$18,260

4

$22,170

5

$25,145

6

$28,359

7 or more

$31,574

You do not have to show that you have these funds if:

  • you have a valid offer of arranged employment in Canada AND

  • you are currently working or authorized to work in Canada.

How much money should you bring?

It is a good idea to research how much it costs to live in the place where you plan to settle in Canada.

Bring as much money as you can to make moving and finding a home in Canada easier. Note, however, that Canadian customs regulations require you to declare if you are bringing more than C$10,000 into Canada. If you do not tell them, you may be fined or put in prison. These funds could be in the form of:

  • cash

  • documents that show property or capital payable to you (such as stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills, etc.) or

  • documents that guarantee payment of a set amount of money, which are payable to you (such as bankers’ drafts, cheques, travellers’ cheques or money orders).



Footnotes

Footnote 1

Use your test results to find your CLB level.

Footnote 2

Having your foreign education assessed.

If you do not have a Canadian degree or diploma (in some cases, a “certificate”), you must get yourforeign education verified and assessed to prove it is equal to a completed Canadian credential.

You must send an original Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report with proof of your foreign credential (diploma or certificate, and transcripts) or we will not process your application. The ECA report must be done by an agency approved by CIC.

If your report shows that your credential is not equal to a completed Canadian one, you are not eligible to apply under the FSWP.

Note: If you get an ECA, it does not guarantee you a job in your field or that you will be able to get a license in Canada. If you plan to work in an occupation that is regulated in Canada, you should contact the regulatory authority in the province where you plan to live. They can give you important information about getting your license, including any steps you can take before you leave your home country.








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