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Applying for Canadian Travel Documents

Permanent Resident Card and Travel Documents

As of December 31, 2003, Canadian permanent residents require a permanent resident card when returning to Canada by commercial carrier (airplane, boat, train or bus). A permanent resident is someone who has been allowed to enter Canada as an immigrant but who has not become a Canadian citizen. The permanent resident card replaces the paper IMM 1000 Record of Landing document and will be the official proof of status document for Canadian permanent residents.

Canadian permanent residents presently located outside of Canada, who do not have a permanent resident card, should visit a Canadian visa office to obtain a limited-use travel document at a cost of $50.

Notice About Travel Documents

If you are the holder of a valid Permanent Resident Card you do not require a Travel Document. You should present your Card to the transportation company as evidence of your entitlement to return to Canada.

You can not apply to a Canadian mission overseas for a Permanent Resident Card. You can only apply for the card from within Canada.  A Travel Document facilitates return to Canada.

If you are the holder of a Returning Resident Permit, you can no longer use this document to travel to Canada as it is not valid for this purpose under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, which replaced the previous legislation on June 28, 2002. You may need to apply for a Travel Document.

Conditions for the Issuance of a Travel Document

A Travel Document is only issued under certain conditions. In most cases you must show that you have complied with the residency obligation required to remain a permanent resident of Canada. Section 28 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, which is quoted on the back of this letter, sets out the conditions for complying with the residency obligation, as well as the conditions under which humanitarian and compassionate exemptions may be considered.

Section 28 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

  1. A permanent resident must comply with a residency obligation with respect to every five-  year period.
  2. The following provisions govern the residency obligation under subsection (1):

    1. a permanent resident complies with the residency obligation provisions with respect to a five-year period if, for at least 730 days in that five-year period, the permanent resident is physically present in Canada, or:

      1. is outside Canada accompanying a Canadian citizen who is his or her spouse or common-law partner or is a child accompanying a parent;
      2. is outside Canada employed on a full-time basis by a Canadian business or in the public service of Canada or of a province;
      3. is an accompanying spouse, common-law partner or child of a permanent resident who is outside Canada and is employed on a full-time basis by a Canadian business or in the public service of Canada or of a province.
      4. outside Canada accompanying a permanent resident who is their spouse or common-law partner or, in the case of a child, their parent and who is employed on a full-time basis by a Canadian business or in the public service of Canada or of a province, or referred to in regulations providing for other means of compliance;
    2. it is sufficient for a permanent resident to demonstrate at examination

      1. if they have been a permanent resident for less than five years, that they will be able to meet the residency obligation in respect of the five-year period immediately after they became a permanent resident;
      2. if they have been a permanent resident for five years or more, that they have met the residency obligation in respect of the five-year period immediately before the examination; and
    3. a determination by an officer that humanitarian and compassionate considerations relating to a permanent resident, taking into account the best interests of a child directly affected by the determination, justify the retention of permanent resident status overcomes any breach of the residency obligation prior to the determination.

Applying for a Travel Document

You may apply by submitting the completed application for a travel document (permanent resident abroad) along with supporting documents and the receipt of payment of the processing fee. Please note that a separate form must be completed for each applicant, even family members who are minor children.

An application for a travel document must always include the following:

  • a valid passport,
  • a completed application form,
  • a NON REFUNDABLE processing fee,
  • two recent passport-sized photographs for each applicant.

Requirements for a Travel Document

Applicants should also provide proof of compliance with the residency obligation provisions with respect to a five-year period that, for at least 730 days in that five-year period, the permanent resident is physically present in Canada

  • their document of landing (the form IMM1000), if available,
  • photo identification issued by Canadian federal or provincial governments i.e. driver's license, health card, etc.
  • T4 slips for the previous five years,
  • a copy of their spouse's Canadian passport or Citizenship card, if applicable,
  • if a minor, a copy of his or her parent's Canadian passport or Citizenship card, if applicable,
  • other official government correspondence dating from the time they were in Canada,
  • evidence of employment by a Canadian company, if applicable.

For same day service, you can apply from Monday - Thursday before 11:30 A.M., or you can apply by mail.  - How to reach us (Austria).

For more information on residency requirements and exceptions, please download our application kit:

All included forms are required.


Additional Information:


Application for a Travel Document (Permanent Resident Abroad) (CIC WEB SITE)


ADULT TRAVEL DOCUMENT APPLICATION  for stateless and protected persons in Canada (16 years of age or over)

A Canadian travel document reflects the identity of the applicant as determined by proof of immigration status in Canada issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada and documents to support identity.

Travel Document* (United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, 1951 and its Protocol of 1967): issued to persons in Canada with protected person status, including Convention refugees and persons in need of protection.

Certificate of Identity*: issued to permanent residents of Canada who are not yet Canadian citizens, who are stateless, or who are unable to obtain a national passport.

Warning—Some countries may not accept the certificate of identity as a valid travel document. You should check with the consulate or embassy of the country you will be visiting before applying for a certificate of identity.

Warning—Travel documents and certificates of identity are not valid for travel to bearer’s country of citizenship.

Children under 16 years of age must have an individual travel document. Use form PPTC 192, Child Travel Document Application.

Immigrant loan account: If you have an immigrant loan account with Citizenship and Immigration Canada and have not been making regular payments (account in delinquent status), a travel document may not be issued until you bring your account into good standing with Citizenship and Immigration Canada officials.
Enquiries regarding loan repayment
:

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Collection Services
Jean Edmonds Tower North
300 Slater Street, 3rd Floor
Ottawa ON K1A 1L1

*Eligibility for either a travel document or a certificate of identity can only be determined after all required information has been submitted and reviewed. These documents are issued only in Gatineau, Quebec.

The Fees

Travel Document—C$87 (includes the travel document service fee of C$62 and consular services fee of C$25) 

Certificate of Identity—C$127 (includes the certificate of identity service fee of C$102 and consular services fee of C$25)

All applicants must pay C$87 when submitting an application. If Passport Canada determines that you are not eligible for a travel document but may be eligible for a certificate of identity, you will be asked to provide the balance payable of C$40 before your application is processed.

Note: Passport Canada does not accept personal cheques or payment in cash for applications submitted in Canada.

Accepted methods of payment (Canadian funds only)

Debit card (in person only).
Credit card (fill out and detach section D of this form and enclose it with your application).
Certified cheque or money order/international money order
(postal or bank) payable to the Receiver General for Canada.


Application for a Travel Document (Permanent Resident Abroad)

Permanent residents returning to Canada by airplane, boat, train or bus must show a validPR Card or travel document before boarding. The following application is for permanent residents outside of Canada who need proof of their status so they can return to Canada. Use this travel document if you have lost your documents showing your permanent residence status.

This application includes the following items:

If you cannot view and print this application from this website, contact your nearestCanadian visa office abroad.

Many visa offices have specific local instructions about which documents you must submit with your application. You need to find out what they are, and make sure you include all the correct documents. Consult the list of Canadian visa offices abroad to find the office responsible for your country under “Applications for Travel Documents (Permanent Residents Abroad).” The page for your visa office includes a link to their website. Go to the website and find out what requirements and procedures you must follow when you apply.

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